Live Radio Show: 7AM – 9AM Tuesday 4.29.14: WPKN 89.5 FM CT/NYC area

Telex_1977Tomorrow morning: 7AM-9AM EST (that’s NYC time, buddy) I will be doing a guest DJ set on-air at WPKN, 89.5 FM.

If yr in the NYC metro area, you can tune in as you sit in traffic on I-95/the LIE/the Merritt/ etc.

Or just visit the WPKN website and click the ‘Listen Now’ button.

I ‘ve put together a set of electro and electro-pop from my LP stacks.  All vinyl, folks.  No cheating.

‘PKN is a wonderful listener-supported radio station that has been a big part of my musical life since I was a kid.  Just some artists that I discovered via this venerable institution:


Fairchild Pro Audio Equipment of 1972

Faichild_Modular_Console_1972

Above: The Fairchild Integrated Console of 1972

How y’all doing out there.  Today at PS dot com: some interesting bits from the archive: a collection of Fairchild data sheets from 1972.  Download all 12 pages here:

Fairchild_1972_prods

Products covered, with texts, specs, and photos, include: Fairchild ‘integrated’ console, Reverbertron 659A, the FPC series of ‘portable mixing consoles,’ 610 and 870 power amps, plus a whole slew of distribution amps and power supplies that i just ain’t got time to list.  Enjoy!

Fairchild_Reverbatron_1972Faichild_PowerAmps_1972Fairchild_FPC_50_Console_1972

 

A DIY Electronic Music Studio circa 1971

Texas_studio_1971Today on PS dot com: a 1971 article by one Robert C. Ehle on the subject of ‘The Electronic Music Studio.’

Download here: Elec_Music_1971

The article includes a schematic for an audio-triggered frequency divider (ala early ‘woodwind synthesizers’) and some interesting other bits, such as discussion of tape-based time compression (which we covered earlier,,,  click here for that article).

Tape_TimeCompresion_1971Bleep Bleep.

Bloop Bloop.

#dubstep

Tape

 

Of Interest to Recording Engineers: Interesting 1971 Article On Distant Mic’ing

Distant_Micing_1

Above: what the authors suggest you do NOT do…

How y’all doing out there in the land of Ooo…  srry for the dearth of new ‘content’ lately; it’s been v v busy here at PS dot com HQ.  Anyhow, I recently came across an interesting article in an old issue of DB magazine concerning distant-mic’ing.  The authors are Roger Anderson and Robert Schulein; you can download it here:

DOWNLOAD: Distant_Micing

Essentially, the concept is that best-results with distant-mic’ing are obtained when the microphone is as close to the most prominent boundary (in most cases, the studio floor) as possible.

D_M_2I use both a distant-mic and a close -mic on pretty much every instrument that I record at GCR; I don’t always use both sources, but shit, we’ve got a big, great-sounding room, why not record it?  But I’ve always set the distant-mic on a stand approx. 4-feet above the floor, much like the diagram above.   I carefully position it to obtain what I feel is an appropriate balance between direct and reflected sound, but I’ve never thought much about how far it is from the floor.  Anderson & Schulein make a very compelling argument for doing otherwise, and I’m gonna give it a shot at this week’s sessions.

DM_3To all my working recording-engineer readers:  thoughts on this technique?  Weigh in,,,

Highlights from the 1971 AES Convention

AES_1971,,,and today, perhaps unsurprisingly: some of the new kit unveiled in 1971 at the NYC AES show, also via DB mag.  Of note: Auto-Tec, Scully, Ampex and 3M intro’d new 16-track machines, Neve made a push for a new console (would this have been the series 80?), AKG introduced the BX-20 reverb, Melcor showed its model 5001 electronic reverb (anyone???), and a new company called Eventide introduced a digital pitch-shift device!  The Neumann U47-fet and Sennheiser MHK-815 mics were introduced, as were the Marantz 500 and Crown M2000 power amplifiers.

Click here to DL a pdf of the proceedings: AES_1971_DBmag

AES_1971_1AES_1971_2AES_1971_3AES_1971_4

There is just a shit-tonne more of this stuff, so click the link below to READ ON;;;;;

Continue reading Highlights from the 1971 AES Convention

Highlights from the 1970 AES Convention, Los Angeles, CA

GRT_deckabove: the GRT 500 audio-tape evaluator c. 1970

Just in case you were too-young/too-hypothetical to have attended, we are pleased to bring you highlights from the 1970 convention of the Audio Engineering Society (via ye olde DB Magazine, r.i.p.).   You can download the whole shebang here…

DOWNLOAD: AES_1970_DB_mag

…and we’ve also reproduced it below for your browsing enjoyment.  Products on offer at that time include: mixing consoles from Electrodyne, Gately, Quad-Eight, Spectra-sonics, Fairchild, Langevin, and Altec.  Opamp labs had kits on offer as well.  Tape machines include 3M, Otari ‘of Japan,’ Teac 7030, GRT 500, Norelco (Phillips) pro-51, Sony Superscope TC-850, and Ampex. Dolby’s model 360 N/R system debuted, as did the Melcor ‘all electronic’ reverb and the Urei LA-3. New microphones on offer included the Electro-voice DS-35 and the Shure SM-53.

AES_1970_1AES_1970_2AES_1970_3AES_1970_4AES_1970_5AES_1970_6AES_1970_7AES_1970_8