“Think of a sound. Now make it. Any sound is now possible.”

FirefoxScreenSnapz001Contributor T. Fine recommends these excellent pieces on early electronic music.  First, a really fun circa 2006 Australian documentary film:

…And a reminder that the MOMA is still running its “Making Music Modern: Design for Ear and Eye” series:

Moma_Aria_radioIn describing some of the musical objects in their collection, the curators write, “…MoMA was the first museum in the world to collect such objects, beginning in 1932, (and) also pioneered the live presentation of some new music technologies. For instance, Russian émigré Vladimir Ussachevsky performed the first tape-music concert in the United States at MoMA in October 1952. And though the Museum’s collection does not include a synthesizer, it presented the famed Moog synthesizer as a live performance instrument for the very first time on August 28, 1969, changing the course of music history and influencing decades of future instrument design.

moog_in_the_Garden Herb_at_moogLearn more about this historic event at the MOMA’s blog.

LINK TO LISTEN: Live Radio Show: A LIFE IN MUSIC with Peter Katis: WPKN 89.5FM and WPKN.ORG

PKmix02Updated: this program has already aired, but you can listen to the full show at this link

We are very excited to announce that this coming Saturday April 18th WPKN FM will air the first live episode of: PRESERVATION SOUND: A LIFE IN MUSIC, a series of conversations and listening parties with notable individuals who have enjoyed long careers in the recording industry. Our April 18th episode features producer Peter Katis. Best known for his work with rock groups like Interpol and The National, Katis will discuss the changing landscape of pop and rock music over the past 30 years, reflecting on changes in technology, aesthetics, and the industry. But most importantly, we’ll be listening to a ton of great music from Katis’s career of over 100 albums.

The circa 1983 Yamaha MT44 4-track and CS01 synth: examining advertising claims

MT_and_csYamaha used to run these great ads in the 80s featuring their MT44 4-track and cheap lil CS01 synthesizer.

Yama_prod_seriesThey called it the “Producer Series.”  Since I had a CS01 and an MT44, I decided to see what was possible to do with just these two machines.  The MT44 is a regular-speed-deck, so fidelity is not great, but here’s what I whipped up in an hour.   I did not use the dolby cos,,,, i hate dolby!   There are 6 tracks (snare, bass, and bell line were bounced) and the only other piece of kit is a $25 behringer “Analog delay” pedal that’s fkkn awful.  Enjoy!

Yamaha_MT44d_exp

LISTEN:

Magnecord History: The Book: circa 1950

MagnecordIncCoverMagnecord, along with Ampex, was one of the first manufacturers of professional 15ips hi-fidelity tape machines in the world.  While not remembered as clearly as their rival, Magnecord built a tremendous number of machines, and many of them have survived to this day.  We have two at Gold Coast Recorders and after minimal repairs they still work just fine, nearly seventy years after their Chicago manufacture.

Magnecord_Advert_1950I picked up our two Magnecord PT6s at the Elephants Trunk flea market a few years ago for $25 each, and shortly after posting some new recordings made that I with the PT6s I was contacted by D. Boyers, son of Magnecord co-founder John Boyers.  D provided us with an incredible amount of impossible-to-find archival material from Magnecord; you can start to dig through it at this link.

Magncord_foundersFast forward to 2015: D. recently located a long-lost 45pp book that Magnecord created in 1950, presumably for the purpose of pitching new business to the US Government.  In his words:

“I have uncovered what appears to be a very complete book detailing several aspects of the very early years. This 45-page document provides an inside look at the roles of key personnel within the organization, including several photos of workers and assembly facilities in the early factory.

The book appears to have been put together in about 1950, four years after Magnecord was first organized, and it lists several of the early accomplishments of the fledgling company, including their first year of a million dollars in gross sales. (Back when that was serious money)”

You can download the entire 45pp volume (posted as five PDFs due to file size) at the links immediately below:  DOWNLOAD:

Magnecord_1950_part_1

Magnecord_1950_part_2

Magnecord_1950_part_3

Magnecord_1950_part_4

Magnecord_1950_part_5

EngineeringDepartment_MagnecordThis book offers an incredible look into the very first days of professional magnetic recording as well as capturing the enterprising spirit of a young pro-audio company growing fast and seeing limitless possibilities ahead.  Enjoy –

MetalWork_magnecord Magnecord_Installation Magnecord_Army  FinalTestingStation_Magnecord DraftingRoom_MagnecordRecordHeads_Equalizers_magnecord

LINK TO LISTEN: “I Swore I’d Never Go Back” : Live Radio Show March 22 2015: The Nineties

IMG_2516We put together an EMERGENCY SHOW for an overnight  on WPKN 89.5 FM.

My special guest is noted 90’s fanzine creator Emily Muffinbones and we will be bringing you THREE HOURS of nineties indie, lo-fi, and ‘complaint rock’ as my pops used to call it.  All from the original 33RPM LPs and 45s.

this program has now aired, but you can listen at this link,,click here,,,

Click the link below for the complete setlist.

Continue reading LINK TO LISTEN: “I Swore I’d Never Go Back” : Live Radio Show March 22 2015: The Nineties

INDIAN POINT doc feature w/our analog synth score to debut at Tribeca

IndianPointFilmIn case you’ve been wondering, “but what does he DO with that sound equipment,” earlier this year I had the chance to work along with composer Nathan Halpern on director Ivy Meeropol’s documentary feature “Indian Point.” We are pleased to announce that the film will make its world premiere in competition at the Tribeca Film Festival.  Our extensive score features a wealth of vintage analog and digital synths and the film is a must-see for anyone interested in our energy future.

information and ideas about audio history